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Graf leaves halfway house for Kerrville apartment

Graf leaves halfway house for Kerrville apartment

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Edward E. Graf Jr. is living in Kerrville after his release from an El Paso halfway house.

Convicted murderer Edward E. Graf Jr., who was sentenced to 60 years in prison in October, is settling into his new apartment in Kerrville, monitored 24 hours by a GPS system.

Graf, 62, was released from prison on mandatory parole seven days after he admitted killing his two adopted stepsons in 1986, and was sent to a halfway house in El Paso.

He spent about 3 1/2 months at the halfway house before parole officials approved his new residence, the River Oaks Apartments on Water Street in Kerrville.

“I pray for the safety and welfare of citizens in any community where Ed Graf will live and work,” said Clare Bradburn, Graf’s ex-wife and the mother of the two boys, Jason, 8, and Joby, 9.

“As I understand, halfway houses are temporary living and the goal is to rehabilitate criminals back into society. How can a twice-convicted, double child murderer, who has lied for 26 years and finally confessed to brutally burning my young sons alive, be rehabilitated in four months? Ed Graf will never be rehabilitated.”

Texas Department of Criminal Justice spokesman Jason Clark confirmed Graf is living on parole in Kerrville. Graf is under the Super-Intensive Supervision Program and will be monitored 24 hours a day by a GPS ankle monitor, Clark said.

Graf must seek a job and have a daily schedule. Should he deviate from that schedule, the GPS monitor will alert a parole officer, Clark said.

The Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles also has placed restrictions on counties Graf can enter and live in. McLennan, Denton, Harris, Wichita and Henderson counties are off- limits to Graf, Clark said.

Graf will be supervised by parole officials until April 29, 2048, according to Clark.

It initially was thought that Graf would stay in the halfway house until his sister’s and brother-in-law’s new home was ready in Wimberly. That plan changed, but Clark declined to say why.

“He submitted a couple of different proposals, and our parole staff reviewed those and determined they weren’t appropriate,” Clark said.

Waco attorney Walter M. Reaves Jr., one of Graf’s attorneys on his retrial, said he is unsure if Graf will be able to find a job with his record.

“He’s 62 years old with a college education, but he spent the last 26 years in prison,” Reaves said. “I don’t know. He certainly is capable of doing a lot of things. Whether he will have the opportunity to do that is another question. But I am happy he is finally out. I hope he can find a job and move forward.”

Graf was convicted of capital murder and sentenced to life in prison in 1988 in the arson deaths of the boys, who died in a shed fire behind his former home in Hewitt.

New trial

The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals awarded him a new trial, ruling the arson science evidence used against him at the first trial was faulty.

At his retrial, Graf was sentenced to 60 years in prison after he struck a plea bargain with prosecutors just before a 54th State District Court jury reached a guilty verdict after 11 hours of deliberations.

Graf was eligible for immediate mandatory release on parole because the good-time credits he earned in prison and the 26 years he served in prison and in jail combined to make his release from prison mandatory under the law in effect at the time of the crime.

Michelle Tuegel, another of Graf’s trial attorneys, said she is glad Graf is out of prison.

“We are also thankful he has a good family support system, because that can really make the difference,” Tuegel said.

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