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Meta's decision to soon reinstate Donald Trump’s Facebook account comes at a critical moment as the former president tries to gain momentum in what has been widely derided as a lackluster start to his third bid for the White House. Trump’s return would allow him to start sharing messages with his 34 million followers, but for the former president, Facebook is mostly about money. The site became a crucial source of funds for Trump’s 2016 and 2020 campaigns, and Wednesday’s decision is seen as a boon for the campaign’s efforts to fundraise, collect emails and identify voters.

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Facebook parent Meta says it will restore former President Donald Trump’s personal account in the coming weeks, ending a two-year suspension it imposed in the wake of the Jan. 6 insurrection. The company said in a blog post Wednesday it is adding “new guardrails” to ensure there are no “repeat offenders” who violate its rules. Trump was suspended on Jan. 7, a day after the deadly 2021 insurrection. Other social media companies also kicked him off their platforms, though he was recently reinstated on Twitter after Elon Musk took over the company. Responding to the news, Trump blasted Facebook’s original decision to suspend his account and praised Truth Social, the site he created after being blocked from Twitter.

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Tesla CEO Elon Musk’s impulsive and sometimes inflammatory usage of Twitter has taken center stage in a trial focused on whether he misled investors with his 2018 tweets indicating he had lined up financing to take the electric automaker private, a proposal that rapidly unraveled. The spotlight on Musk’s tweeting habits came a day after the 51-year-old billionaire completed three days of defiant testimony in which he told a nine-member jury why he believed he could have pulled off a potential Tesla buyout that he tweeted about in 2018. Musk posted the tweets that got him into trouble a few weeks after investors urged him to stay off Twitter.

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More landlords are taking Twitter to court over unpaid rent, this time at the social media company’s headquarters in San Francisco and its British offices. It's the latest legal headache for billionaire owner Elon Musk, who has been trying to slash expenses and faces a separate lawsuit over Tesla. California court documents show that Twitter is facing a lawsuit over allegations it failed to pay rent for its head office. The owner of its premises in central London, meanwhile, said it’s taking the company to court over rental debt. Twitter has already been taken to court this month for falling behind on rent at another San Francisco office. Twitter didn't respond to a request for comment.

Thursday’s British Academy Film Awards nominations brought plenty of drama. Steven Spielberg’s semi-autobiographical “The Fabelmans” and the Tom Cruise-led “Top Gun: Maverick” were largely snubbed by BAFTA voters after winning big at previous ceremonies. Neither is a finalist for film of the year, and Spielberg isn’t nominated for best director. The only nomination for “The Fabelmans” came for ...

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New research shows climate misinformation has been flourishing on Twitter since Elon Musk bought the platform last year. Analysts at the Institute for Strategic Dialogue find searches for information about climate change turned up recommendations for content that denied the reality of climate change or made misleading claims about efforts to mitigate its effects. On Facebook owner Meta, the researchers identified thousands of ads paid for by fossil fuel companies that criticized renewable energy and the need to act on climate change. Scientists and environmental advocates say such content undercuts public support for climate policies while showing tech companies are failing to enforce their own policies against climate misinformation.

As alarms began to go off globally about a novel coronavirus spreading in China, officials in Washington turned to the intelligence agencies for insights about the threat the virus posed to America.But the most useful early warnings came not from spies or intercepts, but from open-source intelligence.

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Like the tobacco, oil, gun, opioid and vaping industries before them, the big U.S. social media companies are now facing lawsuits brought by public entities that seek to hold them accountable for a huge societal problem in the mental health crisis among youth. But the new lawsuits — one by the public school district in Seattle last week, with a second filed by a suburban district Monday and almost certainly more to come — face an uncertain legal road. The U.S. Supreme Court is scheduled to hear arguments next month over the extent to which federal law protects the tech industry from such claims when social media algorithms push potentially harmful content.

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A spokesperson for Romanian anti-organized crime agency DIICOT said the court rejected an appeal by Tate against a judge's decision to extend his arrest from 24 hours to 30 days.

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Former national security adviser Michael Flynn has had his Twitter account reinstated as the United States marked the two-year anniversary of the Jan. 6 insurrection. Twitter suspended the account of the retired Army lieutenant general two days after the violent assault on the capitol. Flynn had more than 1 million followers at the time and had used the platform to become a top spreader of false information about the 2020 election.

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Personal emails linked to 235 million Twitter accounts hacked some time ago have been exposed according to Israeli security researcher Alon Gal — making millions vulnerable to having their accounts compromised or identities exposed if they have used the site anonymously to criticize oppressive governments, for instance. Gal, co-founder and chief technology officer at cybersecurity firm Hudson Rock, wrote in a LinkedIn post this week that the leak “will unfortunately lead to a lot of hacking, targeted phishing, and doxxing.” While passwords were not leaked, malicious hackers could use the email addresses to try to reset people’s passwords, or guess them if they are commonly used.

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The term “metaverse” is the latest buzzword to capture the tech industry’s imagination. Facebook parent Meta is the best-known entrant into this futuristic virtual concept But it’s certainly not the only one. At this year’s CES, the tech industry showcase in Las Vegas, the metaverse is a key theme. That's according to Kinsey Fabrizio, senior vice president at the trade group Consumer Technology Association. She pointed to automaker Stellantis and software giant Microsoft, which have a partnership to create a showroom in the metaverse. As with any emerging technology, there are plenty of concerns around the metaverse and whether it could exacerbate real-world problems.

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